Browse Items (19 total)

  • Tags: Swords

VAFO00000409_D_1.jpg
Such a pattern would probably date from the 1730-1740 period in Europe. In this case, it is believed to be an American hilt. Allowing for the normal delay before new styles gained acceptance in the colonies, a 1740-1750 dating has been estimated. The…

VAFO00000392_D_1.jpg
This early small sword further illustrates the pattern's 17th century evolution from the heavy rapier. The double-ended quillions were forged as one piece to include the uneven pas d'ane (or "arms of the hilt"). Its tall thin cylindrical grip is…

VAFO00000401_D_1.jpg
One of the interesting aspects of the small sword was the blade. Designed for thrusting, its cross section assumed many forms - principally elliptical, triangular, diamond, and hexagonal. This one is an undulating "flamboyant" pattern. It is…

VAFO00000366_D_1.jpg
This expanding guard has a hollowed out knuckle bow into which fits two thin sections that pivot out when needed and lock into position by a spring near the grip's base. A small friction clip from the outboard branch fits through a mid-point hole in…

VAFO00000271_D_1.jpg
This better quality specimen was probably used by a noncom or officer, but it still bears the large military fleur-de-lis stamp on both faces of the blade. The brass is embellished with raised 18th century designs, including a military panoply of…

VAFO00000227_D_1.jpg
This grenadier's grid pattern creates a surprisingly sturdy hilt. The red wool liner, backed by thin buckskin, remains, but may be a later addition. Its guard opens at the base to form three areas into which project open iron hearts. The antler grip…

VAFO00000322_D_1.jpg
The colonial brass pommel head of this example is better defined than many. It is formed from two vertical shells joined at a median seam and secures the wooden grip which does not taper, but provides grooves for steep curving ropes of brass wire.…

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This hilt illustrates some of the fine cut steel work from England contemporary with the last years of the War for Independence. The spaces between its side branches are now filled with prolific designs creating a semi-basket guard which also expands…

VAFO00000313_D_1.jpg
Not all of these delicate cuttoes were mounted in silver. This fine piece, for example, has a brass hilt. Notice, too, the green dyed ivory grip, as well as the curved pommel plate bearing a raised face, and the contemporary designs engraved on the…

VAFO00000306_D_1.jpg
Near the mid 1700's the French popularized a variation of the hunting sword pattern usually mounted in silver, with short opposite curving quillons (counterguards) projection as frail counterguards. These dress swords were called "couteau-de-chasse".…
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