Browse Items (7 total)

  • Tags: America

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This American naval blunderbuss is a crude amalgamation of brass and iron components to assemble a working firearm. The walnut stock appears to be the remains of a one-time swivel gun, evidence by a side hole once used for supporting a “Y” yoke…

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This “Mountain” rifle offers an excellent example of these crude mountain-style American Rifles made in the back country of the southern colonies. The wood stock features a unique “grease hole” in the butt which held thick grease used to…

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This French fusil includes a walnut stock which secures the iron barrel using three brass barrel bands. The stock is surcharged “U STATES” on the butt stock, signifying government ownership by the young United States. This practice was adopted…

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This American Flintlock Musket illustrates the ingenuity of the American colonists to assemble firearms from various components and available firearms, early in the war. The musket is patterned after the English Land Service Musket, a weapon…

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Such a pattern would probably date from the 1730-1740 period in Europe. In this case, it is believed to be an American hilt. Allowing for the normal delay before new styles gained acceptance in the colonies, a 1740-1750 dating has been estimated. The…

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The colonial brass pommel head of this example is better defined than many. It is formed from two vertical shells joined at a median seam and secures the wooden grip which does not taper, but provides grooves for steep curving ropes of brass wire.…

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A stirrup-type hilt is again present on this sword. Its ivory grip has a 3/4" ferrule at the base, and a cap pommel. The elliptical counterguard was apparently cut from a flat piece of brass; it has three decorative piercings opposite each side of…
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